Aga.Elliott's blog

Monday, 11 January, 2021
“Locked On” - the famous Wapiti Lake pack tracking their prey. 30x40 oil on stretched linen, complete and submitted for the David Shepherd Wildlife Artist of the Year competition. The Wolf pack, led by the alpha female, travel single-file through the deep snow to save energy. Wolves walking in a single-file line through deep snow is a classic example of how they are able to use weather conditions to their advantage while hunting much larger prey. The behavior of the Wolf pack is family-oriented and cooperative, and not a dominance hierarchy.I am so happy and proud to announce that...
Sunday, 3 January, 2021
“Kissed by the Sun”, the second painting in my collection "Stop the War on Wildlife" is finished and available. For the thousands of captive-bred African lions, their life of suffering begins shortly after birth. Before becoming a trophy, lions are bred and raised on breeding farms where cubs are removed from their mothers and used as photo props for tourists, or raised by volunteers who mistakenly believe they are contributing to the conservation of lions in the wild. The cubs are frequently ill due to stress brought on by constant contact with humans, poor nutrition,...
Sunday, 3 January, 2021
Every day I come across articles about people deciding which animals should be included in the Endangered Species List and which ones shouldn’t. What gives us the right to decide? Every species, and every individual animal, is part of an ecosystem at a micro and macro level, and needs our protection and stewardship. Humans systematically wiped out wolves in North America, only to reintroduce them to Yellowstone National Park once we became more “educated”. But the slaughter of wolves continues outside of our fake protective boundaries.Why does anyone feel the need...
Sunday, 3 January, 2021
Elk are aslo called wapiti, a Native American word that means "light-colored deer". During the late summer breeding season the bugling of bull elk echoes through the mountains. These powerful animals strip the velvet off their new antlers using them in violent clashes that determine who gets to mate with whom. Males with the bigger antlers, typically older animals, usually win these battles.This painting is up for an auction to raise funds for Mount Evans Home Health Care and Hospice in Evergreen, CO.
Sunday, 3 January, 2021
This "little" guy captured my heart a few years ago, while driving through South Dakota. His sadness was quite disturbing...he, amongst other beautiful animals, was subjected to being a resident of a drive-thru wildlife park."Longing for the Forest", 9x12, oil on canvas panel.