Press Coverage & Publications

Southwest Art Magazine Editorial

May, 2017

This story was featured in the May 2016 issue of Southwest Art magazine. Get the Southwest Art May 2016 print issue or digital download now–then subscribe to Southwest Art and never miss another story.

The effects at play in Sandi Lear’s watercolors might be called loose, free, colorful, or ethereal. Lear herself, however, uses the phrase “essential allegorical representationalism” when discussing her aesthetic. “I choose my subject as it strikes an allegorical chord, then I capture its essence and paint it in a representational style,” says the Australian artist. “I always include a hidden message in my work—something that holds the viewer’s attention, asking, why is it there? What is the story here? I merely suggest, inviting the viewer to form an emotional connection, to imagine his or her own story.” 

Approximately 20 of Lear’s thought-provoking watercolors are on view in an ongoing exhibition at The Longworth Gallery on Canyon Road beginning April 1. A reception takes place from 5 to 8 p.m. on Friday, May 27.

Lisa Rodgers, gallery owner, says Lear’s compassion spills out onto her paintings. “Her deep connection with nature, the ocean, and water is obvious in her work, and also with endangered species,” she says. Lear, who contributes to conservation efforts, reveals that certain subjects evoke an “upswell of emotion” in her. “When I select a subject, such as HOPE, it is because there is something there that needs to be said,” the artist says. “We had the death of Cecil [the lion], which to me was diagnostic of all that is going wrong in the world. The allegory is twofold: celebrating the incredible royalty of his bearing and mastery of all he surveys—while in an invisible enclosure—but gazing up to the heavens as if in plea for mankind to save him.”

One of the other thrills for the artist is experimenting with the medium of watercolor. “Allowing it to do its thing means that temperature, humidity, angle and characteristics of the paper, pigment, and water have to be considered,” she says. “FLARE represents the passion I have for watercolor, and the relationship I have with these organic substances—water and earth (pigment and paper), air (which influences drying time) and fire—the passion for the piece.” —Jessica Canterbury

contact information
505.989.4210
www.thelongworthgallery.com

+ Read more

Southwest Art Magazine Editorial

May, 2017

This story was featured in the May 2016 issue of Southwest Art magazine. Get the Southwest Art May 2016 print issue or digital download now–then subscribe to Southwest Art and never miss another story.

The effects at play in Sandi Lear’s watercolors might be called loose, free, colorful, or ethereal. Lear herself, however, uses the phrase “essential allegorical representationalism” when discussing her aesthetic. “I choose my subject as it strikes an allegorical chord, then I capture its essence and paint it in a representational style,” says the Australian artist. “I always include a hidden message in my work—something that holds the viewer’s attention, asking, why is it there? What is the story here? I merely suggest, inviting the viewer to form an emotional connection, to imagine his or her own story.” 

Approximately 20 of Lear’s thought-provoking watercolors are on view in an ongoing exhibition at The Longworth Gallery on Canyon Road beginning April 1. A reception takes place from 5 to 8 p.m. on Friday, May 27.

Lisa Rodgers, gallery owner, says Lear’s compassion spills out onto her paintings. “Her deep connection with nature, the ocean, and water is obvious in her work, and also with endangered species,” she says. Lear, who contributes to conservation efforts, reveals that certain subjects evoke an “upswell of emotion” in her. “When I select a subject, such as HOPE, it is because there is something there that needs to be said,” the artist says. “We had the death of Cecil [the lion], which to me was diagnostic of all that is going wrong in the world. The allegory is twofold: celebrating the incredible royalty of his bearing and mastery of all he surveys—while in an invisible enclosure—but gazing up to the heavens as if in plea for mankind to save him.”

One of the other thrills for the artist is experimenting with the medium of watercolor. “Allowing it to do its thing means that temperature, humidity, angle and characteristics of the paper, pigment, and water have to be considered,” she says. “FLARE represents the passion I have for watercolor, and the relationship I have with these organic substances—water and earth (pigment and paper), air (which influences drying time) and fire—the passion for the piece.” —Jessica Canterbury

contact information
505.989.4210
www.thelongworthgallery.com

+ Read more

Southwest Art Magazine Editorial

Apr, 2016

This story was featured in the May 2016 issue of Southwest Art magazine. Get the Southwest Art May 2016 print issue or digital download now–then subscribe to Southwest Art and never miss another story.

The effects at play in Sandi Lear’s watercolors might be called loose, free, colorful, or ethereal. Lear herself, however, uses the phrase “essential allegorical representationalism” when discussing her aesthetic. “I choose my subject as it strikes an allegorical chord, then I capture its essence and paint it in a representational style,” says the Australian artist. “I always include a hidden message in my work—something that holds the viewer’s attention, asking, why is it there? What is the story here? I merely suggest, inviting the viewer to form an emotional connection, to imagine his or her own story.” 

Approximately 20 of Lear’s thought-provoking watercolors are on view in an ongoing exhibition at The Longworth Gallery on Canyon Road beginning April 1. A reception takes place from 5 to 8 p.m. on Friday, May 27.

Lisa Rodgers, gallery owner, says Lear’s compassion spills out onto her paintings. “Her deep connection with nature, the ocean, and water is obvious in her work, and also with endangered species,” she says. Lear, who contributes to conservation efforts, reveals that certain subjects evoke an “upswell of emotion” in her. “When I select a subject, such as HOPE, it is because there is something there that needs to be said,” the artist says. “We had the death of Cecil [the lion], which to me was diagnostic of all that is going wrong in the world. The allegory is twofold: celebrating the incredible royalty of his bearing and mastery of all he surveys—while in an invisible enclosure—but gazing up to the heavens as if in plea for mankind to save him.”

One of the other thrills for the artist is experimenting with the medium of watercolor. “Allowing it to do its thing means that temperature, humidity, angle and characteristics of the paper, pigment, and water have to be considered,” she says. “FLARE represents the passion I have for watercolor, and the relationship I have with these organic substances—water and earth (pigment and paper), air (which influences drying time) and fire—the passion for the piece.” —Jessica Canterbury

contact information
505.989.4210
www.thelongworthgallery.com

+ Read more

Southwest Art Magazine Editorial

Apr, 2016

This story was featured in the May 2016 issue of Southwest Art magazine. Get the Southwest Art May 2016 print issue or digital download now–then subscribe to Southwest Art and never miss another story.

The effects at play in Sandi Lear’s watercolors might be called loose, free, colorful, or ethereal. Lear herself, however, uses the phrase “essential allegorical representationalism” when discussing her aesthetic. “I choose my subject as it strikes an allegorical chord, then I capture its essence and paint it in a representational style,” says the Australian artist. “I always include a hidden message in my work—something that holds the viewer’s attention, asking, why is it there? What is the story here? I merely suggest, inviting the viewer to form an emotional connection, to imagine his or her own story.” 

Approximately 20 of Lear’s thought-provoking watercolors are on view in an ongoing exhibition at The Longworth Gallery on Canyon Road beginning April 1. A reception takes place from 5 to 8 p.m. on Friday, May 27.

Lisa Rodgers, gallery owner, says Lear’s compassion spills out onto her paintings. “Her deep connection with nature, the ocean, and water is obvious in her work, and also with endangered species,” she says. Lear, who contributes to conservation efforts, reveals that certain subjects evoke an “upswell of emotion” in her. “When I select a subject, such as HOPE, it is because there is something there that needs to be said,” the artist says. “We had the death of Cecil [the lion], which to me was diagnostic of all that is going wrong in the world. The allegory is twofold: celebrating the incredible royalty of his bearing and mastery of all he surveys—while in an invisible enclosure—but gazing up to the heavens as if in plea for mankind to save him.”

One of the other thrills for the artist is experimenting with the medium of watercolor. “Allowing it to do its thing means that temperature, humidity, angle and characteristics of the paper, pigment, and water have to be considered,” she says. “FLARE represents the passion I have for watercolor, and the relationship I have with these organic substances—water and earth (pigment and paper), air (which influences drying time) and fire—the passion for the piece.” —Jessica Canterbury

contact information
505.989.4210
www.thelongworthgallery.com

+ Read more

News of Our World Editorial

Jan, 2016

Article for News of Our World, Hallidays Point, January 2016.

 

 

In 2008 Sandi Lear experienced a change in her perception caused by circumstances.  It changed the way she looks at the world.  She sees colours differently, animals differently, clouds, trees, the ocean, nature, birds - all with a brightness and vivid life that she never truly noticed before.

 

Born in Victoria, Sandi’s father’s career took him all over Australia.  13 schools in Adelaide, Hobart, Devonport, Brisbane and all parts in between provided an ability to accept change and move on, quite literally.  Sandi’s mother loved to play guitar and create wonderful pen and ink works of heritage buildings; teaching her daughter to dance they would often jive around the kitchen together.  Her grandfather loved classical music and Sandi spent many an hour at his knee listening to Rachmaninov and Tchaikovsky.

 

Departing Australia in the early 80’s Sandi became a ‘citizen of the world’ for the next 16 years, sailing the northern hemisphere on her yacht ‘Caroline’ for 7 of those, working in the North Sea oil industry, veterinary technician in the Caribbean, and charter chef on mega-yacths.  Returning home, she volunteered and then became an OIC/Paramedic in Queensland, a wonderful career of some 15 years, culminating in her Masters of Medical Science and a member of the first cohort of Physician Associates in Australia.

 

Convinced of an artistic bent due to her photography, in 2012 her partner convinced her to pick up a pencil and draw a still life.  This from a lady who was told at high school by her art teacher to “stick to physics”.  In July of that year Sandi attended ArtEscape in Cairns, a workshop run by Mike Ferris a local Architect and wonderful watercolorist.  ‘Pride’, the piece produced as a result, won Best Emerging Artist that year. The experience sparked a passion, dedication and all consuming love of the medium and it’s creative outlet.

 

Falling in love with watercolours was not a choice, it just happened.  “People are constantly telling me how hard it is, and I say is it? I don't know how hard it is, nobody told me!” Sandi paints in a loose style, empathising with her subject but finding the essence and creating a point of exquisite focus in detail, leaving the remainder in abstract.  “Every piece is allegorical, it tells a story”, Sandi says.  “I am very happy to tell my story, but I would like the viewer to see something different every time.  Yes they may recognise the subject, but where is the work taking them? They can explore their own story, perhaps sparking a memory or an emotion”.  

 

For Sandi, the pigments used in watercolour are living organic things, they have a life of their own.  Some are bullies and push and shove each other out of the way, others are more shy and insinuate themselves, mixing, tangling and weaving, creating new colours.  This interaction with the hills and valleys of beautiful 100% cotton rag paper creates pure magic.

 

Frequent travellers, Sandi and her partner John live in Diamond Beach and Sandi will be holding a “Something Wild” workshop for anyone interested in developing their creativity.  Covering everything from initial drawing, concept, design and composition through to a finished piece, the workshop promises to be a lot of fun and hard work, and will be held at Halliday’s Point Library from Friday 18th- Sunday 20th March 2016.  Bookings essential, contact the Library for further information.

 

Sandi’s work can also be found in The Longworth Gallery, Santa Fe, New Mexico, where she will be heading in May for her US debut; and The Museum of Contemporary Art, Shanghai, among others. A keen conservationist, she has also donated work to raise funds and awareness for wildlife projects.

 

Visit Sandi’s website at www.sandilear.com and feel free to contact her for more information.